Canadian Journal of Human Rights

Category

United Nations

Troubling Waters: Recent Developments in Canada on International Law and the Right to Water and Sanitation

Author: Karen Busby Abstract In less than a decade, Canada has moved from resisting the recognition of the human right to water and sanitation in international law to explicitly recognizing the right. This paper reviews how Canada and, tangentially, other countries,… Continue Reading →

Book Review: The Twilight of Human Rights Law

Eric A. Posner, The Twilight of Human Rights Law (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014) 185 pages. Author: David Hughes Excerpt Late in 2014, Egyptian officials appeared before the United Nation’s Human Rights Council in Geneva to participate in a Periodic… Continue Reading →

Cultural Restoration in International Law: Pathways to Indigenous Self-Determination

Author: Jeff Corntassel Abstract How are land-based and water-based cultural harms addressed and remedied for Indigenous peoples? Under existing international legal norms, states and other non-state entities have a duty to provide redress for the harms of colonialism and occupation,… Continue Reading →

Membership and the UN Human Rights Council

Author: Conall Mallory Abstract Established in March 2006 to directly replace the discredited Commission on Human Rights, the Human Rights Council carries the heavy burden of restoring credibility in the United Nations principal human rights institution. This article examines one… Continue Reading →

SOGI… So What? Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity and Human Rights Discourse at the United Nations

Author: Jena McGill Abstract This paper presents a critical appraisal of the “term of inclusion” by which issues related to sexual and gender diversity are being incorporated into international human rights discourse at the United Nations (UN): the category “sexual… Continue Reading →

Tough on Terror, Short on Nuance: Identifying the Use of Force as a Basis for Excluding Resisters Seeking Refugee Status

Author: Amar Khoday Abstract The use of force has been a significant feature of many political struggles and resistance movements. The consequences for its participants may include the possibility of persecution if not death. Some will flee and seek protection… Continue Reading →

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